Social header sharing

What happens in 2nd Year Geography?

A Picture of Mira

At the beginning of this summer, most 2nd year geography students, both human and physical, are finally starting their dissertation. We have been working hard this past spring to put together a research question that will win Nobel-prizes and stop poverty, and now is the time to put all we have learned on fieldtrips and practicals into action. In geography, you can go pretty much with any idea you could possibly think of, of course staying around geographical issues. What really is amazing about this degree is that geography covers so much, from health care availability to the movement of ocean currents and their effect on climate, and anything between!

My dissertation topic, avalanches in Troms, Norway, is interesting in a way because I need to collect my data from Norwegian websites. Yup, you read right, I need to learn Norwegian. Fun times! The avalanche database offers some information in English, too, but the actual database and the program online is only in Norwegian, and as I said earlier, geography really is about everything. What wouldn’t one do for this subject..?

d-200

 is for Dissertation!

I am going home in a couple of days, and since I’m spending my time ‘abroad’ the whole summer and will be engaged with different activities, time-management is really important. You’d think that I have plenty of time to collect the data, process it, and possibly even finish my results-section. The dissertation is 10,000 words, and I have a limited amount of time. The hand-in is in March 2016 and it feels like ages away. But if there’s anything I have learned in the past two years in terms of assignments; it’s to start early! Time will fly and the dissertation won’t be the only thing you’ll be doing in your final year, (un)fortunately.

PROTIP: Always,  always save your work at least in three different places. Email, computer, external hard drive, and even on a memory stick. Imagine losing all your work, let’s say, a week before handing in your dissertation.. I learned this recently by losing a 3,200-word report, which I found eventually, but I certainly won’t be making that mistake again!

Okay, I think I have rattled on enough now. Good luck with your exams, or work, or whatever is going on your life!

Mira

 

Pin It
Share on Tumblr

Got a question? just ask us

dropdown arrow

Legal | Freedom of information | Sitemap
Newcastle University, NE1 7RU, United Kingdom, Telephone: (0191) 208 6000
From outside the UK dial +44 191 208 6000.